Wertheim, Germany

Wertheim, Germany ©Jean Janssen

Wertheim, Germany
©Jean Janssen

Water level markings as early as 1595) on the buildings in Wertheim, Germany ©Jean Janssen

Water level markings as early as 1595) on the buildings in Wertheim, Germany
©Jean Janssen

Today we are docked at the small village of Wertheim.  Ordinarily, there would be a visit to a private castle in the afternoon, but the family is not opening the home this day, so our touring is limited.  This traditional village at the intersection of Tauber and Main rivers has suffered more from flooding than bombing.  All over the town there are marks indicating how high the water level has been.  Wertheim has a charming medieval feel and has been referred to as “little Heidelberg”.

Wertheim is in the northernmost corner of the German state of Baden Wurtemberg.  The city is mentioned in chronicles staging as early as the 8th century and was once the seat of the ruling Counts of Wertheim-Breubeg. In Wertheim, you will find one the ruins of one of the oldest large stone fortresses in southern Germany, dating back to 1100.

Burg Wertheim ©Jean Janssen

Burg Wertheim, one of the largest stone fortresses in southern Germany, dating from 1100.
©Jean Janssen

Converted city walls in Wertheim, Germany ©Jean Janssen

Converted city walls in Wertheim, Germany
©Jean Janssen

Like other medieval cities, portions of the city walls remain.  Wertheim citizens cleverly converted the walls into shops, homes, and other structures.  We stopped first at the Pointed Tower, now leaning due to the extensive flooding.  Even small Wertheim has worked to acknowledge its further Jewish presence, outlining the location of a former synagog and marking the building and streets where former Jewish residents lived.

Along the Tauber River, Wertheim, Germany ©Jean Janssen

Along the Tauber River, Wertheim, Germany
©Jean Janssen

We are docked on the Main (pronounced like Mine or Mein) River, but we wandered over to the Tauber and saw the fishermen’s cottages lining this picturesque spot. Headed back into town, we saw the glass works museum, town hall, and some beautiful churches and chapels.  Look up from almost any spot and you can see the ruins of the Burg Wertheim which dominates from above.

Susan and Janet pose with the Wild Boar at our sausage booth.  Wertheim, Germany ©Jean Janssen

Susan and Janet pose with the Wild Boar at our sausage booth. Wertheim, Germany
©Jean Janssen

Angel's Well, Wertheim, Germany ©Jean Janssen

Angel’s Well, Wertheim, Germany
©Jean Janssen

Returning to the medieval city center, we found a few more booths in the market open and ended our tour at the Angel’s Well.  I found some unique gifts in the market and Boris and I had some excellent gluhwein (hot spiced wine).  Feeling fortified and brave, we tried some wild boar sausage.  It was quite good.  Boris even got some to take home.

Medieval mark of the Buther Hans Stark, dating from 1583.  Wertheim, Germany ©Jean Janssen

Medieval mark of the Buther Hans Stark, dating from 1583. Wertheim, Germany
©Jean Janssen

There were lots of interesting spots to photograph, but Wertheim can be seen in half a day.  After snacking and shopping, we headed back to the ship to warm up.  It is a short tour day.  Everyone was back on the boat, so we even left early heading out to Frankfurt and enjoying our only day of viewing from the boat.  Leaving Wertheim, we had a wonderful view of the castle ruins.  We were in the dining room at the rear of the boat and I so wished I had had my camera.  Traveling the opposite direction would give you a lovely view.

Boris, Frank, and Steve enjoy in the Wertheim Christmas Market ©Jean Janssen

Boris, Frank, and Steve enjoy the Wertheim Christmas Market
©Jean Janssen

I spent the afternoon in the Lounge enjoying the views along the river.  My intent was to sort through my materials and do a little writing, but I did a lot more visiting instead.  Occasionally you would look out and see a lovely castle or ruins along the way.  There were river side villages showing the signs of late fall, but no winter snow as yet.  I love these afternoons of just looking out.  Boris napped.  I only wished it was warm enough to sit outside.  Instead I was near a door so I could pop out and take a photograph before returning quickly inside for the warmth.

Along the Main River, Germany ©Jean Janssen

Along the Main River, Germany
©Jean Janssen

medieval carvings, Wertheim, Germany ©Jean Janssen

medieval carvings, Wertheim, Germany
©Jean Janssen

There was a cookie making demonstration and (like last year) recipes that will require difficult to find ingredients and amount conversions from metric.  I met the husband of the couple who were the single pair to stay on board when the boat moved from Kitzingen to Wurzburg when we toured Rothenburg.  His wife had been sick.  He said they had a great day, the chef making them whatever they wanted for lunch (he had a steak) and being waited on in the lounge by 6 staff members while they cruised the river.  They did go through quite a few locks that day.

In the morning we will dock in Frankfurt early.  We have been given tour options for the city and will spend another night on board before an early departure on Sunday.

Along the Main River, Germany ©Jean Janssen

Along the Main River, Germany
©Jean Janssen

DSC_9299_419

Along the Main River, near Wertheim, Germany ©Jean Janssen

 

 

 

About travelbynatasha

I am a retired attorney who loves to travel. Several years ago I began working on a Century Club membership achieved by traveling to 100 "foreign" countries. Today, at 49 years of age the count is at 82. Many were visited on land based trips. Some were cruise ports. Some were dive sites. Most have been fascinating.
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